Appellate

  • March 01, 2024

    Wash. Judge Doubts Public Was Shut Out Of Shelter Plan

    A Washington state appellate judge on Friday asked opponents of a plan to turn a hotel near Seattle into a shelter for homeless people why a pair of community meetings weren't enough to meet King County's obligation to listen to public feedback. 

  • March 01, 2024

    3rd Circ. Preview: Exxon Whistleblower Case Fuels March

    Headlining the list of Third Circuit arguments in March is a bid from a pair of ExxonMobil whistleblowers to have the courts recognize an Occupational Safety and Health Administration order reinstating their jobs after they were fired following a press report mirroring internal complaints they made about the company's alleged misjudgment of energy output in the Delaware River Basin. 

  • March 01, 2024

    2nd Circ. Won't Revive Ex-Barclays Exec's Whistleblower Suit

    The Second Circuit on Friday affirmed a lower court's decision to toss a whistleblower suit from a former Barclays executive, finding that he didn't sufficiently back up his allegations of retaliation under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act.

  • March 01, 2024

    DOJ Defends Broad Enron Law Reading In Capitol Riot Suit

    A federal law that makes it a crime to "corruptly" obstruct an official proceeding was intended as a "catchall offense" and can be used to prosecute participants in the Jan. 6, 2021, riot at the U.S. Capitol, the federal government told the U.S. Supreme Court.

  • March 01, 2024

    Ill. Attys Sued For Defamation Can Still Assert Privilege

    An Illinois appellate panel held Friday that an exception to attorney-client privilege for criminal or fraudulent conduct does not extend to alleged defamation by attorneys, reversing a trial court that applied it to a Chicago attorney and law firm facing a defamation suit from the former senior pastor of an Illinois megachurch.

  • March 01, 2024

    Plaintiffs Blast Prison Health Co.'s 'Potemkin Village' Case

    An attorney for plaintiffs seeking the dismissal of prison health care company Tehum Care Services Inc.'s "Texas Two-Step" bankruptcy case assailed on Friday what he called the "Potemkin village" nature of the debtor during the first day of a trial unfolding in Texas bankruptcy court.

  • March 01, 2024

    DC Circ. Revives BuzzFeed's Bid For HSBC Laundering Report

    The D.C. Circuit handed former BuzzFeed reporter Jason Leopold a win Friday, reviving his fight to unseal a 2015 report on money laundering at HSBC Bank and remanding the Justice Department's earlier district court summary judgment win in the case.

  • March 01, 2024

    4 Argument Sessions Benefits Attys Should Watch In March

    The Biden administration will urge the Fifth Circuit to preserve preventive services requirements in the Affordable Care Act, the Eighth Circuit will dive into an insurer's payment practices, and the Eleventh Circuit will hear Home Depot workers' bid to revive their 401(k) suit.

  • March 01, 2024

    Judge Says TCPA Class Limits Affect Only State Law Claims

    A Washington federal judge denied UnitedHealthcare's move to dismiss illegal automated call claims from non-Washington members in a Washington man's class action, calling the company's invocation of a 2017 U.S. Supreme Court ruling a "strained theory that has been rejected by every Circuit Court that has considered it."

  • March 01, 2024

    5th Circ. Accepts Miss. Medical Pot Co. Ad Ban Lawsuit

    A Mississippi medical marijuana dispensary is taking its fight to upend a state law banning medical cannabis advertising to the Fifth Circuit, asking the appeals court to review a federal judge's decision to toss its First Amendment claims.

  • March 01, 2024

    Pa. Supreme Court Snapshot: Judge's Side Gig Vexes Tax Row

    In its first argument session of 2024, the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania will once again have seven justices on the bench to hear cases concerning issues like a judge taking a second job, following last year's elevation of Superior Court Judge Daniel D. McCaffery to fill the vacancy left by the death of former Chief Justice Max Baer in 2022.

  • March 01, 2024

    11th Circ. Revives Alabama Life Insurance Class Action

    An Eleventh Circuit panel on Friday revived a South Carolina man's Alabama class action alleging his life insurer's costs on his $100,000 policy weren't linked to life expectancy, though the policy said they would be.

  • March 01, 2024

    Applebee's Atty's 'Mega-Blunder' Warrants Retrial, Court Says

    A Florida appellate panel said Friday that counsel for an Applebee's restaurant made an improper closing statement characterized by one panelist as a "mega-blunder," warranting a retrial of an injury suit accusing the restaurant of causing a customer's slip-and-fall injuries.

  • March 01, 2024

    DC Circ. Says EPA Went Too Far In Voiding State Air Plans

    The D.C. Circuit on Friday handed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency a mixed bag regarding its authority to veto state air pollution plans, finding some state policies that exempt polluting facilities during startup, shutdown and malfunction phases are acceptable under the Clean Air Act, while others are not.

  • March 01, 2024

    Conn. Lawmakers OK $25.2M Deal For 2 Jailed In 1985 Killing

    The Connecticut General Assembly's bipartisan joint judiciary committee on Friday unanimously approved a $25.2 million settlement for two men who lawmakers agreed were improperly incarcerated for more than 30 years after a chain of failures led to wrongful convictions in a December 1985 New Milford murder.

  • March 01, 2024

    Tort Report: $42M Med Mal Award; Hot Coffee Suit In The Air

    A suit over hot coffee spilled at 40,000 feet and the affirmation of a $42 million medical malpractice verdict in Illinois lead Law360's Tort Report, which compiles recent personal injury and medical malpractice news that may have flown under the radar.

  • March 01, 2024

    DC Circ. Finds Rehab's Flyers Aren't Unlawful Surveillance

    The D.C. Circuit found Friday that a rehabilitation facility was within its rights under federal labor law to distribute flyers during a union drive, departing from the National Labor Relations Board's conclusion that the handouts were part of an illegal surveillance violation.

  • March 01, 2024

    9th Circ. Won't Stay Oregon Kids' Climate Case, For Now

    The Ninth Circuit has shot down the U.S. Department of Justice's attempt to pause an Oregon federal judge's decision to allow a lawsuit brought by youths alleging the government's energy policies imperil their future by exacerbating climate change. 

  • March 01, 2024

    'Texas Heartbeat Act' Civil Enforcement Suit Can Proceed

    A Texas state appellate court sided with a woman weighing civil action against the Texas Equal Access Fund, saying Thursday that the recent "sea change" in abortion law doesn't upend the so-called Texas Heartbeat Act's enforcement mechanisms, and the woman has the right to determine whether she will sue the reproductive rights advocacy organization.

  • March 01, 2024

    Ex-Raytheon Worker Asks Full 5th Circ. To Revive Firing Suit

    An ex-Raytheon engineer pressed the full Fifth Circuit to reconsider a panel decision blocking claims that he was fired for reporting concerns with a naval system, saying the panel wrongly expanded a national security court review bar to government contractors.

  • March 01, 2024

    Auto Coverage Hinges On Victim's Domicile, Mich. Panel Says

    A dispute over personal protection insurance will return to a trial court to determine whether a crash victim was residing in Michigan or Kentucky at the time of the incident, after a Michigan state appeals court granted neither the victim's guardian nor Progressive an early win.

  • March 01, 2024

    Panel Backs Tossing Of Eli Lilly, Bayer Drug Marketing Suits

    A New Jersey state appeals court on Friday upheld the tossing of two lawsuits accusing Bayer Corp. and Eli Lilly & Co. Inc. of engaging in "unlawful marketing schemes" leading to false claims submissions to government healthcare programs, finding the cases did not meet the "public disclosure bar."

  • March 01, 2024

    DC Circ. Enforces UAW Bargaining Order With Auto Parts Co.

    The National Labor Relations Board correctly found that an automotive parts manufacturer stalled and improperly withdrew recognition from a United Auto Workers local after union certification, the D.C. Circuit ruled Friday, denying the company's request to challenge the ruling and granting the board's bid to enforce it.

  • March 01, 2024

    Fla. Judge Resigns Amid Ethics Charges Over Ex Parte Chat

    A Florida state judge has resigned, ending an ethics case triggered by his allegedly biased ex parte comments to a prosecutor following a Zoom hearing in August.

  • March 01, 2024

    DeSantis Blasts Ousted Florida Atty's Bid To Speed Up Appeal

    Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis pushed back Friday against an ousted prosecutor's request that the Eleventh Circuit expedite consideration of the governor's petition for a rehearing en banc with respect to a decision reviving the attorney's lawsuit against DeSantis, saying the case has "sweeping implications" for the state.

Expert Analysis

  • Strategies For Single-Member Special Litigation Committees

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    The Delaware Supreme Court's recent order in the Baker Hughes derivative litigation allowing testimony from a single-member special litigation committee highlights the fact that, while single-member SLCs are subject to heightened scrutiny, they can also provide unique opportunities, says Josh Bloom at MoloLamken.

  • 10th Circ. Ruling Means More Okla. Oilfield Pollution Litigation

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    By applying Oklahoma's statutory definitions of pollution to a private landowner's claim for negligence for the first time, the Tenth Circuit's recent decision in Lazy S Ranch v. Valero will likely make it harder to obtain summary judgment in oilfield contamination cases, and will lead to more litigation, say attorneys at GableGotwals.

  • Race Bias Defense Considerations After 11th Circ. Ruling

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    In Tynes v. Florida Department of Juvenile Justice, the Eleventh Circuit affirmed that the McDonnell Douglas test for employment discrimination cases is merely an evidentiary framework, so employers relying on it as a substantive standard of liability may need to rethink their litigation strategy, says Helen Jay at Phelps Dunbar.

  • How Firms Can Ensure Associate Gender Parity Lasts

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    Among associates, women now outnumber men for the first time, but progress toward gender equality at the top of the legal profession remains glacially slow, and firms must implement time-tested solutions to ensure associates’ gender parity lasts throughout their careers, say Kelly Culhane and Nicole Joseph at Culhane Meadows.

  • Fed. Circ. In Feb.: Using Prior Products To Invalidate A Patent

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    The Federal Circuit's recent Weber v. Provisu ruling, that prior-product operating manuals constituted printed publications that can be used to invalidate patents in an inter partes review proceeding, makes it easier for a petitioner to invalidate a patent, say Sean Murray and Jeremiah Helm at Knobbe Martens.

  • 7 Common Myths About Lateral Partner Moves

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    As lateral recruiting remains a key factor for law firm growth, partners considering a lateral move should be aware of a few commonly held myths — some of which contain a kernel of truth, and some of which are flat out wrong, says Dave Maurer at Major Lindsey.

  • What's At Stake In Pending Fed. Circ. Design Patent Test Case

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    The full Federal Circuit recently heard argument in LKQ v. GM Global, a case concerning patent obviousness in the aftermarket for auto parts; the court's decision will likely influence how design patents are obtained, enforced and challenged, and affect the broader innovation ecosystem, says Larry DeMeo at Hunton.

  • Series

    Cheering In The NFL Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Balancing my time between a BigLaw career and my role as an NFL cheerleader has taught me that pursuing your passions outside of work is not a distraction, but rather an opportunity to harness important skills that can positively affect how you approach work and view success in your career, says Rachel Schuster at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Opinion

    Compassionate Release Grants Needed Now More Than Ever

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    After the U.S. Sentencing Commission's recent expansion of the criteria for determining compassionate release eligibility, courts should grant such motions more frequently in light of the inherently dangerous conditions presented by increasingly understaffed and overpopulated federal prisons, say Alan Ellis and Mark Allenbaugh at the Law Offices of Alan Ellis.

  • Args In APA Case Amplify Justices' Focus On Agency Power

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    In arguments last week in Corner Post v. Federal Reserve, the U.S. Supreme Court justices paid particular importance to the possible ripple effects of their decision, which will address when a facial challenge to long-standing federal rules under the Administrative Procedure Act first accrues and could thus unleash a flood of new lawsuits, say attorneys at Snell & Wilmer.

  • After TikTok, Tiptoeing Toward Patent Transfer Alignment

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    Following the Fifth Circuit's TikTok decision, which aimed to standardize transfer analysis in patent cases, the Federal Circuit and Texas federal courts facing transfer requests have taken small steps to consider the practical realities of patent litigation, reinforcing the intensely factual focus of the analysis, says Charles Fowler at McKool Smith.

  • Mitigating Whistleblower Risks After High Court UBS Ruling

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    While it is always good practice for companies to periodically review whistleblower trainings, policies and procedures, the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent whistleblower-friendly ruling in Murray v. UBS Securities helps demonstrate their importance in reducing litigation risk, say attorneys at Arnold & Porter.

  • What Recent Setbacks In Court Mean For Enviro Justice

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    Two courts in Louisiana last month limited the federal government's ability to require consideration of Civil Rights Act disparate impacts when evaluating state-issued permits — likely providing a framework for opposition to environmental justice initiatives in other states, say attorneys at King & Spalding.

  • Justices' Double Jeopardy Ruling Preserves Acquittal Sanctity

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    The U.S. Supreme Court’s unanimous decision last week in McElrath v. Georgia, barring the state from retrying a man acquitted of murder after a so-called repugnant verdict, is significant in the tangled web of double jeopardy jurisprudence for its brief and unequivocal protection of an acquittal’s finality, says Lissa Griffin at Pace Law School.

  • Setting The Stage For High Court BofA Escrow Interest Case

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    Dori Bailey and Curtis Johnson at Bond Schoeneck examine relevant legislation and case law dating back 200 years ahead of oral arguments at the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday in Cantero v. Bank of America, the outcome of which will determine whether state laws governing mortgage escrow accounts can be enforced against national banks.

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